Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

FYS: Socrates and his Intellectual Context
AS.001.121 (01)

This First-Year Seminar will focus on the figure of Socrates. Socrates wrote nothing, so we depend on others for our knowledge of him. We will examine the ways he is portrayed by several different authors, including Plato. We will also examine some other ideas around in his time - some of which were pretty radical - and consider how he may have reacted to them. Finally, we will examine his influence on later thought.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 2:00PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN, PHIL-ETHICS

Introduction to Formal Logic
AS.150.118 (01)

An introduction to symbolic logic and probability. In the first two parts of the course we study formal ways of determining whether a conclusion of an argument follows from its premises. Included are truth-functional logic and predicate logic. In the third part we study the basic rules of probability, and learn how to make probability calculations and decisions in life.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter (Peter)
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND

Introduction to Formal Logic
AS.150.118 (02)

An introduction to symbolic logic and probability. In the first two parts of the course we study formal ways of determining whether a conclusion of an argument follows from its premises. Included are truth-functional logic and predicate logic. In the third part we study the basic rules of probability, and learn how to make probability calculations and decisions in life.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter (Peter)
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND

Introduction to Formal Logic
AS.150.118 (03)

An introduction to symbolic logic and probability. In the first two parts of the course we study formal ways of determining whether a conclusion of an argument follows from its premises. Included are truth-functional logic and predicate logic. In the third part we study the basic rules of probability, and learn how to make probability calculations and decisions in life.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter (Peter)
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND

Introduction to Formal Logic
AS.150.118 (04)

An introduction to symbolic logic and probability. In the first two parts of the course we study formal ways of determining whether a conclusion of an argument follows from its premises. Included are truth-functional logic and predicate logic. In the third part we study the basic rules of probability, and learn how to make probability calculations and decisions in life.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter (Peter)
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND

Introduction to the History of Modern Philosophy
AS.150.205 (01)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Intro Hist of Mod Philos
AS.150.205 (02)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Intro Hist of Mod Philos
AS.150.205 (03)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Intro Hist of Mod Philos
AS.150.205 (04)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Problems with Knowledge, Evidence, and Action
AS.150.215 (01)

This course covers a selection of recent work in epistemology and serves as an introduction to these topics. Issues to be discussed include new approaches to the nature of knowledge and skepticism, normative aspects of the way we handle information in our decision-making, epistemic injustices, and epistemic requirements for democratic discourse.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Lossau, Jens Tammo (Tammo)
  • Room: Gilman 288  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI, PHIL-SEM, MSCH-HUM, COGS-PHLMND

Introduction to Moral Philosophy
AS.150.220 (01)

An introduction to moral philosophy through in-depth and critical reading of selected texts from the history of philosophy. The philosophers whose texts will be discussed include Aristotle, Kant, Mill, and Hannah Arendt.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Introduction to Moral Philosophy
AS.150.220 (02)

An introduction to moral philosophy through in-depth and critical reading of selected texts from the history of philosophy. The philosophers whose texts will be discussed include Aristotle, Kant, Mill, and Hannah Arendt.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Introduction to Moral Philosophy
AS.150.220 (03)

An introduction to moral philosophy through in-depth and critical reading of selected texts from the history of philosophy. The philosophers whose texts will be discussed include Aristotle, Kant, Mill, and Hannah Arendt.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Introduction to Moral Philosophy
AS.150.220 (04)

An introduction to moral philosophy through in-depth and critical reading of selected texts from the history of philosophy. The philosophers whose texts will be discussed include Aristotle, Kant, Mill, and Hannah Arendt.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Introduction to Moral Philosophy
AS.150.220 (05)

An introduction to moral philosophy through in-depth and critical reading of selected texts from the history of philosophy. The philosophers whose texts will be discussed include Aristotle, Kant, Mill, and Hannah Arendt.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, W 4:30PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Introduction to Moral Philosophy
AS.150.220 (06)

An introduction to moral philosophy through in-depth and critical reading of selected texts from the history of philosophy. The philosophers whose texts will be discussed include Aristotle, Kant, Mill, and Hannah Arendt.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, W 4:30PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Intro-Political Philosop
AS.150.240 (01)

This course begins by reviewing canonical texts in modern political philosophy beginning with Thomas Hobbes and John Locke and ends by exploring classic questions in contemporary debates in race, gender, and identity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT

Intro-Political Philosop
AS.150.240 (02)

This course begins by reviewing canonical texts in modern political philosophy beginning with Thomas Hobbes and John Locke and ends by exploring classic questions in contemporary debates in race, gender, and identity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT

Prometheus Editorial Workshop
AS.150.300 (01)

Prometheus is an international undergraduate philosophy journal published by students at Johns Hopkins University. The purpose of the journal is to promote philosophic discourse of the highest standard by offering students an opportunity to engage in open discussion, participate in the production and publication of an academic journal, and establish a community of aspiring philosophers. Students enrolled in this workshop will act as the staff readers for the journal. For more information, please visit https://prometheus.students.jh.edu/ Prerequisite: MUST have taken one philosophy course

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 7:00PM - 8:00PM
  • Instructor: Cummings, Cara Rei
  • Room: Gilman 288  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/28
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Majors Seminar: Political Philosophy and Justice
AS.150.301 (01)

This course focuses on the idea of justice as understood within the framework of liberal theory beginning with John Locke and focusing on John Rawls, then explores contemporary challenges to that framework.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-SEM, PHIL-MIND

Applied Public Health Ethics and Decision-Making
AS.150.312 (01)

In this course, students receive an introduction to core theoretical foundations and case studies in public and global health ethics. this course adopts an applied framework for understanding how public health ethical values are navigated in different decision-making processes. This course is geared toward juniors and seniors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Gur-Arie, Rachel E
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS

Technology, Democracy, and Social Justice
AS.150.313 (01)

This course will consider healthcare technologies through the lens of political values: democracy and social justice. At a broad level, we will ask of these technologies: Who should decide on their design and use when the experts don’t resemble the public and the public lacks expertise? How can we provide broad access to the benefits of these new technologies without exposing vulnerable people to further risk and unfairness? More narrowly, the course will focus on four technologies that affect healthcare: anti-malarial “gene drive” mosquitoes, medical AI, genomic data collection, and social media. Gene drives hold the promise of modifying mosquitoes to prevent the spread of infectious disease, but they also expose people in lower-income countries to unanticipated risks. Artificial intelligence and genomic data can deliver scarce medical resources to those who need it most and tailor it to minorities based on their precise characteristics. But they can also exacerbate existing unfairness while exposing minorities to risks of further discrimination and surveillance. Social media has a similar potential to deliver crucial health data, especially in a pandemic. But it also promotes the spread of misinformation among the populations most in need of help. This course will consider how we can balance the benefits and risks of these novel technologies and who gets to decide that balance.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS

Hellenistic Philosophy
AS.150.403 (01)

A study of later Greek philosophy, stretching roughly from the death of Aristotle to the Roman imperial period. Epicureans, Stoics, and Skeptics will be the main philosophical schools examined.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard
  • Room: Gilman 288  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Evidence: An Introduction
AS.150.405 (01)

What is evidence? Can it ever be disregarded in science, the law, or religion, and if so, when? What are the paradoxes of evidence (grue, ravens) and how can they be solved?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter (Peter)
  • Room: Gilman 288  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 4/10
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI

Mathematical Logic II
AS.150.421 (01)

Euclid set a precedent for the codification of mathematics by axiomatizing the set of geometric truths. An obvious question that arises is whether all branches of mathematics are axiomatizable, especially fundamental ones, such as arithmetic. In the late nineteenth century, what became known as Peano arithmetic was proposed as an axiomatization. The essential feature of an axiomatization is that, although one might have an infinite number of axioms, as does Peano arithmetic, one must have a decision procedure for determining whether a given proposition is or is not an axiom. In 1931, Gödel proved the astounding result that, not only is Peano arithmetic incomplete in the sense that it does not entail all arithmetic truths, but any attempted axiomatization of arithmetic is incomplete, and thus the set of arithmetic truths must be undecidable. Subsequently, Alfred Tarski showed the set of arithmetic truths is not even definable. Also, by finding a finitely axiomatizable undecidable subtheory of Peano arithmetic, Alonzo Church was able to show that there is not even an effective procedure for determining whether a given sentence is a logical truth. Finally, in his 1931 paper, Gödel argued a second incompleteness theorem, viz., that any theory strong enough to express its own consistency, as he showed Peano arithmetic to be, cannot prove its own consistency unless it is inconsistent. We will cover these and other results that have had a profound effect on the foundations of mathematics. It remains an open question whether so basic a theory as Peano arithmetic is consistent.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rynasiewicz, Robert
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit
AS.150.430 (01)

From the opening chapter on "Sense-certainty" to the concluding "Absolute Knowledge," we will follow Hegel's account of the experience of consciousness through the transitions to self-consciousness, reason, spirit, and religion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Moyar, Dean
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Philosophy of Gender
AS.150.436 (01)

In this class we will examine philosophical questions about gender, and about the intersections between gender and other social categories including race, class and sexuality. We will focus specifically on questions about the metaphysics of gender and other social categories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Taylor, Elanor J.
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MIND

Berkeley’s Idealism
AS.150.445 (01)

Idealism is the view that, at bottom, whatever is - is an idea. For the idealist, to be is to be perceived. George Berkeley is probably the most famous idealist among European philosophers, and on this seminar we will read closely two of his major texts: Principles of Human Knowledge and Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonus. Topics to be discussed include: the nature of bodies, the nature of the mind, the possible sources of our ides, and Berkeley’s understanding of God.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Melamed, Yitzhak Yohanan
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Topics in Biomedical Ethics: Depression
AS.150.450 (01)

There is a mental health crisis in the United States. One very significant aspect of this crisis is that – according to a recent survey conducted by the CDC -- the prevalence of depression is skyrocketing, particularly among young adults. Unfortunately, we are still woefully inadequate both in identifying cases of depression and, especially, in treating them. It is therefore morally imperative that we gain a better understanding of what depression is and how to treat it. In this course, we will use the tools of philosophical analysis to make headway on these questions. We will explore the nature of depression, address ethical issues in its treatment, and investigate depression’s “significance” – that is, what depression can help teach us about perennial philosophical questions like what makes for a life worth living.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Tully, Ian M
  • Room: Gilman 288  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS, PHIL-BIOETH

Freedom of Will & Moral Responsibility
AS.150.452 (01)

What are freedom of the will and moral responsibility? Are they compatible with determinism or naturalism? This course will examine various philosophers' answers to these questions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Gilman 288  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Philosophy and Cognitive Science
AS.150.476 (01)

This year's topic is perception. Questions will include: In what ways might perceptual states be like and unlike pictures? Does what we believe affect what we perceive? Is linguistic comprehension a kind of perception? This course is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students in philosophy and in the mind brain sciences and related fields. Others may be successful in the course depending on their prior course of study.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Gross, Steven
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND

The Existential Drama: Philosophy and Theatre of the Absurd
AS.225.328 (01)

Existentialism, a powerful movement in modern drama and theatre, has had a profound influence on contemporary political thought, ethics, and psychology, and has transformed our very notion of how to stage a play. Selected readings and lectures on the philosophy of Kierkegaard, Nietszche, Camus and Sartre -- and discussion of works for the stage by Sartre, Ionesco, Genet, Beckett, Albee, Pinter, Athol Fugard (with Nkani & Nshone), Heiner Müller and the late plays of Caryl Churchill. Opportunities for projects on Dürrenmatt, Frisch, Havel, Witkiewicz, and Mrozek.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Martin, Joseph H (Joe)
  • Room: Merrick 105  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/13
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.001.121 (01)FYS: Socrates and his Intellectual ContextM 2:00PM - 4:00PMBett, Richard 
 
PHIL-ANCIEN, PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.118 (01)Introduction to Formal LogicMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMAchinstein, Peter (Peter)Virtual Online
 
PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.118 (02)Introduction to Formal LogicMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMAchinstein, Peter (Peter)Virtual Online
 
PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.118 (03)Introduction to Formal LogicMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMAchinstein, Peter (Peter)Virtual Online
 
PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.118 (04)Introduction to Formal LogicMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMAchinstein, Peter (Peter)Virtual Online
 
PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.205 (01)Introduction to the History of Modern PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMWilliams, MichaelVirtual Online
 
PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.205 (02)Intro Hist of Mod PhilosMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMWilliams, MichaelVirtual Online
 
PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.205 (03)Intro Hist of Mod PhilosMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMWilliams, MichaelVirtual Online
 
PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.205 (04)Intro Hist of Mod PhilosMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMWilliams, MichaelVirtual Online
 
PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.215 (01)Problems with Knowledge, Evidence, and ActionTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLossau, Jens Tammo (Tammo)Gilman 288
 
PHIL-LOGSCI, PHIL-SEM, MSCH-HUM, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.220 (01)Introduction to Moral PhilosophyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMStaffVirtual Online
 
PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.220 (02)Introduction to Moral PhilosophyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMStaffVirtual Online
 
PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.220 (03)Introduction to Moral PhilosophyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMStaffVirtual Online
 
PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.220 (04)Introduction to Moral PhilosophyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMStaffVirtual Online
 
PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.220 (05)Introduction to Moral PhilosophyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, W 4:30PM - 5:20PMStaffVirtual Online
 
PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.220 (06)Introduction to Moral PhilosophyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, W 4:30PM - 5:20PMStaffVirtual Online
 
PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.240 (01)Intro-Political PhilosopMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMLebron, Christopher Joseph 
 
PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT
AS.150.240 (02)Intro-Political PhilosopMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMLebron, Christopher Joseph 
 
PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT
AS.150.300 (01)Prometheus Editorial WorkshopT 7:00PM - 8:00PMCummings, Cara ReiGilman 288
 
AS.150.301 (01)Majors Seminar: Political Philosophy and JusticeW 1:30PM - 4:00PMLebron, Christopher Joseph 
 
PHIL-SEM, PHIL-MIND
AS.150.312 (01)Applied Public Health Ethics and Decision-MakingM 1:30PM - 4:00PMGur-Arie, Rachel E 
 
PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.313 (01)Technology, Democracy, and Social JusticeM 4:00PM - 6:30PMStaff 
 
PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.403 (01)Hellenistic PhilosophyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBett, RichardGilman 288
 
AS.150.405 (01)Evidence: An IntroductionM 1:30PM - 4:00PMAchinstein, Peter (Peter)Gilman 288
 
PHIL-LOGSCI
AS.150.421 (01)Mathematical Logic IITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRynasiewicz, Robert 
 
AS.150.430 (01)Hegel's Phenomenology of SpiritT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMoyar, Dean 
 
AS.150.436 (01)Philosophy of GenderMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMTaylor, Elanor J. 
 
PHIL-MIND
AS.150.445 (01)Berkeley’s IdealismW 4:00PM - 6:30PMMelamed, Yitzhak Yohanan 
 
MSCH-HUM
AS.150.450 (01)Topics in Biomedical Ethics: DepressionW 4:00PM - 6:30PMTully, Ian MGilman 288
 
PHIL-ETHICS, PHIL-BIOETH
AS.150.452 (01)Freedom of Will & Moral ResponsibilityF 1:30PM - 4:00PMBok, HilaryGilman 288
 
AS.150.476 (01)Philosophy and Cognitive ScienceTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMGross, Steven 
 
COGS-PHLMND
AS.225.328 (01)The Existential Drama: Philosophy and Theatre of the AbsurdM 3:00PM - 5:30PMMartin, Joseph H (Joe)Merrick 105