Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Philosophic Classics
AS.150.111 (03)

The course introduces students to philosophy by critically examining selected texts in the Western philosophical tradition. Philosophers whose ideas will be examined include Plato, Descartes, Rousseau and Nietzsche.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Moyar, Dean
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (02)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. The course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI

Freshman Seminar: Skepticism Ancient and Modern
AS.150.194 (01)

Can we gain knowledge of reality, or is everything a matter of opinion? Does it matter? Why do we want (or need) knowledge anyway? Questions like this have been the stock in trade of philosophical skeptics throughout the entire history of our Western philosophical tradition. This class will involve close readings of some classic works on the topic of skepticism with a view to understanding some of the main arguments for (and against) skepticism: how they work and how they may have changed over time. Readings include selections from Sextus Empiricus, Descartes, Hume and Wittgenstein.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN, PHIL-MODERN

Philosophic Classics
AS.150.111 (01)

The course introduces students to philosophy by critically examining selected texts in the Western philosophical tradition. Philosophers whose ideas will be examined include Plato, Descartes, Rousseau and Nietzsche.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Moyar, Dean
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Philosophic Classics
AS.150.111 (02)

The course introduces students to philosophy by critically examining selected texts in the Western philosophical tradition. Philosophers whose ideas will be examined include Plato, Descartes, Rousseau and Nietzsche.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Moyar, Dean
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Philosophic Classics
AS.150.111 (04)

The course introduces students to philosophy by critically examining selected texts in the Western philosophical tradition. Philosophers whose ideas will be examined include Plato, Descartes, Rousseau and Nietzsche.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Moyar, Dean
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (01)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. The course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/21
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (03)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. The course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/21
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (04)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. The course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI

Freshman Seminar: Being A Good Person
AS.150.196 (01)

In this seminar we explore the virtue ethics tradition and its pursuit to figure out what it means to be a good person. We creatively read the canonical tradition as well as less familiar texts in race & gender studies as well as fiction.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Introduction to Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (02)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard
  • Room:  
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Introduction to Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (01)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard
  • Room:  
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 25/25
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (07)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Dante Visits the Afterlife: The Divine Comedy
AS.214.479 (02)

Dante’s Divina commedia is the greatest long poem of the Middle Ages; some say the greatest poem of all time. We will study the Commedia critically to find: (1) What it reveals about the worldview of late-medieval Europe; (2) how it works as poetry; (3) its relation to the intellectual cultures of pagan antiquity and Latin (Catholic) Christianity; (4) its presentation of political and social issues; (5) its influence on intellectual history, in Italy and elsewhere; (6) the challenges it presents to modern readers and translators; (7) what it reveals about Dante’s understanding of cosmology, world history and culture. We will read and discuss the Commedia in English, but students will be expected to familiarize themselves with key Italian terms and concepts. Students taking section 02 (for 4 credits) will spend an additional hour working in Italian at a time to be mutually decided upon by students and professor.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 11:00AM - 11:59AM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room: Hodson 216
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/6
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Descartes and Spinoza
AS.150.485 (01)

Descartes and Spinoza are two of the leading philosophers of the modern period. In the class we will study the works of both figures. Special attention will be assigned to Spinoza’s early works.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 10:00AM - 12:30PM
  • Instructor: Melamed, Yitzhak Yohanan
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN

Dante Visits the Afterlife: The Divine Comedy
AS.214.479 (01)

Dante’s Divina commedia is the greatest long poem of the Middle Ages; some say the greatest poem of all time. We will study the Commedia critically to find: (1) What it reveals about the worldview of late-medieval Europe; (2) how it works as poetry; (3) its relation to the intellectual cultures of pagan antiquity and Latin (Catholic) Christianity; (4) its presentation of political and social issues; (5) its influence on intellectual history, in Italy and elsewhere; (6) the challenges it presents to modern readers and translators; (7) what it reveals about Dante’s understanding of cosmology, world history and culture. We will read and discuss the Commedia in English, but students will be expected to familiarize themselves with key Italian terms and concepts. Students taking section 02 (for 4 credits) will spend an additional hour working in Italian at a time to be mutually decided upon by students and professor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room: Hodson 216
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/13
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Panorama of German Thought
AS.211.265 (01)

This course explores the rich terrain of German literature and philosophical thought, from the Enlightenment to today. At each meeting, we will investigate canonical texts of the German intellectual tradition, with an eye to establishing their well-deserved place in wider, global discourses. In this way, we will learn to think critically with these important literary and philosophical texts from German-speaking lands as a means of viewing and appreciating the full panorama of German thought. Authors discussed may include Kant, Goethe, Schiller, Hegel, Kleist, Heine, Fontane, Nietzsche, Freud, Kafka, Heidegger, Mann and Bernhard. Readings and discussion will be in English. German is appreciated but not required. Students have the option of an additional hour of German discussion (to be scheduled at a mutually agreed time) and doing all the assignments in German for German-language credit (3+1) towards the major or minor. Students interested in that option should register for section 2.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Dornbach, Marton
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT

Freshman Seminar: How Literature Works: Narrative Imagination from Ancient to Modern Times
AS.300.203 (01)

Is storytelling part of human nature? Do myths and legends have a universal structure? As a bridge between experience and language, narratives inform the way we understand history, gender, politics, emotion, cognition and much more. This course will explore how narratives are composed, how they are experienced, and eventually, how they evolve throughout history. We will be reading a diverse selection of ancient and modern texts, including selections from Plato and Aristotle, the Odyssey, the Hebrew Bible, as well as 19th-and-20th-century authors such as the Brothers Grimm, Gustave Flaubert, James Joyce and Virginia Woolf. The second part of the course focuses on philosophical and critical approaches to narrative in arts and media, concluding with the evolving concept of narrative in the digital age. Theoretical readings include selections from Karl Marx, Roland Barthes, Jacques Derrida and Judith Butler. All readings will be in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Sirin, Hale
  • Room: Mattin Center 161
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Existentialism in Literature and Philosophy
AS.213.374 (01)

This course explores the themes of existentialism, including the meaning of existence, the nature of the self, authenticity and inauthenticity, the inescapability of death, the experience of time, anxiety, freedom and responsibility to others, in literary and philosophical works. It will be examined why these philosophical ideas often seem to demand literary expression, or bear a close relation to literary works. Readings may include writings by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, Heidegger, Rilke, Kafka, Simmel, Jaspers, Buber, Sartre, de Beauvoir, and Camus.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Gosetti, Jennifer Anna
  • Room: Hodson 216
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Panorama of German Thought
AS.211.265 (02)

This course explores the rich terrain of German literature and philosophical thought, from the Enlightenment to today. At each meeting, we will investigate canonical texts of the German intellectual tradition, with an eye to establishing their well-deserved place in wider, global discourses. In this way, we will learn to think critically with these important literary and philosophical texts from German-speaking lands as a means of viewing and appreciating the full panorama of German thought. Authors discussed may include Kant, Goethe, Schiller, Hegel, Kleist, Heine, Fontane, Nietzsche, Freud, Kafka, Heidegger, Mann and Bernhard. Readings and discussion will be in English. German is appreciated but not required. Students have the option of an additional hour of German discussion (to be scheduled at a mutually agreed time) and doing all the assignments in German for German-language credit (3+1) towards the major or minor. Students interested in that option should register for section 2.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM, W 5:00PM - 6:00PM
  • Instructor: Dornbach, Marton
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/4
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT

American Philosophy: Pragmatism
AS.150.491 (01)

Studies of major figures in the history of American philosophy beginning with the 19th century. The course focuses on the development of pragmatism in the work Peirce, James and Dewey. Other philosophers, such as Royce and Mead, may also be studied.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (01)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (04)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (02)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (05)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Introduction to Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (04)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard
  • Room:  
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (06)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Introduction to Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (03)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard
  • Room:  
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 25/25
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (03)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (14)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Hobbes' Leviathan
AS.150.481 (01)

Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan is a masterpiece of modern political philosophy. This class is an in-depth study of that work.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:30AM - 1:00PM
  • Instructor: Melamed, Yitzhak Yohanan
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, INST-PT

The Philosophy of Psychology
AS.150.340 (01)

This course will explore a range of philosophical issues in cognitive psychology. Topics include the nature of psychological explanation, the computational theory of mind, the relationship between psychology and neuroscience, consciousness, intentionality, nativism/empiricism, and mental architecture. This course is intended for both philosophy students and any student interested in the mind-brain sciences.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Gunderson, Palmer Jon
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MIND, COGS-PHLMND

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (12)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Hegel’s Philosophy of Right
AS.150.464 (01)

This course will be a close reading of G.W.F. Hegel's Philosophy of Right. Some of the main topics for discussion will be the relation of law and morality, the dependence of the political philosophy on Hegel's Logic, and the relation of individual and social conceptions of freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Moyar, Dean
  • Room: Krieger 180
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (08)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Mathematical Logic I
AS.150.420 (01)

Mathematical Logic I (H,Q) is the first semester of a year long course. It introduces the two notions of validity and provability for both sentential logic and first-order predicate logic, showing in each case that there is a system of derivation such that any argument is valid if and only if the conclusion is provable from the premises. The result is non-trivial since validity is a semantic notion involving the preservation of truth, while a proof is a finite syntactic object whose correctness can be effectively decided. The goal of the course, however, is to learn how to formulate mathematical theories in first-order logic and to explore various of their properties (or lack thereof) such as completeness, decidability, axiomatizability, finite axiomatizability, and consistency. The course concludes with a brief introduction to model theory and the interpretability of one theory in another, which is the basis for relative consistency proofs in mathematics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rynasiewicz, Robert
  • Room: Gilman 77
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (09)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 2:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Philosophy of Space & Time
AS.150.433 (01)

Is space an entity that exists independently of matter (substantivalism), or is it only an abstraction from spatial relations between bodies (relationism)? Is there a lapse of time even when nothing changes, or is time only a measure of motion? Are motion and rest contrary properties or states of a body, or are there only changes in the positions of bodies relative to one another? Philosophers and physicists have disputed these questions from antiquity to the present day. We survey the arguments and attempt to find a resolution. But there are further questions. What is the significance of incongruent counterparts (left hands vs. right hands)? Is there a fact of the matter as to the geometry of space (flat, hyperbolic or elliptical), or as to whether space-like separated events occur at the same time? What is the principle of relativity? Does Einstein’s theory have consequences for the substantivalist/relationist debate? What is the status of spacetime in current physics and cosmology? Why does time but not space have a “direction”? Are past, present and future objective features of reality, or are they merely “stubborn illusions”? Does time flow? If not, how do we account for our sense of the passage of time?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Rynasiewicz, Robert
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (10)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 2:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Hermeneutics and Critrical Theory
AS.150.418 (01)

An introduction to two of the most important and influential schools in twentieth-century German philosophy. This course examines the works of four leading representatives of these schools, i.e. Heidegger, Gadamer, Horkheimer, and Habermas.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Forster, Eckart
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (11)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Kant's 'Critique Of Pure Reason'
AS.150.417 (01)

An examination of the philosophy of Immanuel Kant, with emphasis on The Critique of Pure Reason.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Forster, Eckart
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (13)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Formal Methods of Philosophy
AS.150.434 (01)

For better or for worse (and we think better), during the last century or so, philosophy has become infused with logic. Logic informs nearly every area of philosophy; it is part of our shared language and knowledge base. Vast segments of literature, especially in contemporary analytic philosophy, presuppose basic competence in logic and a familiarity with associated formal methods, particularly set theoretical. The standard philosophy curriculum should therefore guarantee a minimum level of logic literacy, thus enabling students to read the literature without it seeming like an impenetrable foreign tongue. This course is an introductory survey of the formal methods that a contemporary philosopher should be familiar with. It is not mathematically demanding in the way that more advanced courses in metalogic and specialized topics may be. The emphasis is on basic comprehension, not on mathematical virtuosity. Co-taught with AS.150.223 Formal Methods of Philosophy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Bledin, Justin
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND

Majors Seminar: Truth
AS.150.301 (01)

A philosophical exploration of the nature of truth, looking at different theories of truth and related questions about science, morality, logic and rational disagreement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Taylor, Elanor J.
  • Room: Krieger 306
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-SEM

Formal Methods of Philosophy
AS.150.223 (01)

For better or for worse (and we think better), during the last century or so, philosophy has become infused with logic. Logic informs nearly every area of philosophy; it is part of our shared language and knowledge base. Vast segments of literature, especially in contemporary analytic philosophy, presuppose basic competence in logic and a familiarity with associated formal methods, particularly set theoretical. The standard philosophy curriculum should therefore guarantee a minimum level of logic literacy, thus enabling students to read the literature without it seeming like an impenetrable foreign tongue. This course is an introductory survey of the formal methods that a contemporary philosopher should be familiar with. It is not mathematically demanding in the way that more advanced courses in metalogic and specialized topics may be. The emphasis is on basic comprehension, not on mathematical virtuosity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Bledin, Justin
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/30
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND

Evidence, Foundations of Probability, and Speculation
AS.150.483 (01)

The course examines major theories about the meaning of evidence and probability, and in terms of these provides answers to the questions “What is a scientific speculation?” and “When, if at all, is speculating important or even legitimate in science?” No preview study of evidence or probability is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI

The Value of Humanity and Nature
AS.150.463 (01)

We start by posing a question: who, or what, has standing in the moral community? First we consider an appealing answer--humanity--then we consider whether moral status extends to nonhuman animals and the environment. We will focus on the notion of being valuable, and how it relates to moral considerability. No background in philosophy is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:15PM - 6:45PM
  • Instructor: Powell, Kevin Matthew
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Philosophical Conceptions of the Infinite
AS.300.315 (01)

What is the infinite? Can we comprehend it? Can we experience it? In this course we will explore various ways in which philosophers in the western tradition have answered questions such as these. In the first half of the semester, we will examine theoretical treatments of the infinite that inform how we understand the fabric of our world, from the ordinary objects around us to more sublime concepts of God, space, time, and mathematics. In the second half, we will turn to arguments in aesthetics and ethics that reveal an interplay between infinity and finitude occurring before our very eyes. Philosophers we will cover include Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Kant, Hegel, Russell, Levinas, and Arendt. Throughout, we will ask such fundamental questions as, what is the starting point of philosophy? what is its methodology? what can it achieve in terms of knowledge? and in terms of practice?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Host, Alexander Stoltzfus
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

The Contemporary Philosophical Novel
AS.300.309 (01)

What can literature offer to philosophical reflection? Can literature address experiences that evade theoretical philosophy? Or, does fictional writing conflict with rigorous philosophical inquiry? The long-standing separation of philosophy and literature begins when Plato bans poetry and tragedy from the ideal city in the Republic. This seminar focuses on nineteenth and twentieth century thinkers that challenge the predisposition against literature through different attempts to write the “philosophical novel.” In this seminar, we will take seriously the philosophical stakes of literary texts, and investigate how and why literature offers a unique perspective for philosophical reflection. We will read texts by Plato, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, Iris Murdoch, and David Foster-Wallace.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Levi, Jacob Ezra
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.150.111 (03)Philosophic ClassicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMoyar, DeanLevering Arellano
AS.150.136 (02)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMAchinstein, PeterGilman 50COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI
AS.150.194 (01)Freshman Seminar: Skepticism Ancient and ModernM 1:30PM - 4:00PMWilliams, MichaelGilman 413PHIL-ANCIEN, PHIL-MODERN
AS.150.111 (01)Philosophic ClassicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMoyar, DeanLevering Arellano
AS.150.111 (02)Philosophic ClassicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMMoyar, DeanLevering Arellano
AS.150.111 (04)Philosophic ClassicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMMoyar, DeanLevering Arellano
AS.150.136 (01)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMAchinstein, PeterGilman 50COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI
AS.150.136 (03)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMAchinstein, PeterGilman 50COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI
AS.150.136 (04)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMAchinstein, PeterGilman 50COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI
AS.150.196 (01)Freshman Seminar: Being A Good PersonW 1:30PM - 4:00PMLebron, Christopher JosephShriver Hall 001PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.201 (02)Introduction to Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PMBett, Richard PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.150.201 (01)Introduction to Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBett, Richard PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.150.219 (07)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PMBok, HilaryRemsen Hall 1PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.214.479 (02)Dante Visits the Afterlife: The Divine ComedyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 11:00AM - 11:59AMStephens, Walter EHodson 216ENGL-PR1800
AS.150.485 (01)Descartes and SpinozaW 10:00AM - 12:30PMMelamed, Yitzhak YohananGilman 288PHIL-MODERN
AS.214.479 (01)Dante Visits the Afterlife: The Divine ComedyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStephens, Walter EHodson 216ENGL-PR1800
AS.211.265 (01)Panorama of German ThoughtTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMDornbach, MartonGilman 313GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT
AS.300.203 (01)Freshman Seminar: How Literature Works: Narrative Imagination from Ancient to Modern TimesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMSirin, HaleMattin Center 161
AS.213.374 (01)Existentialism in Literature and PhilosophyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGosetti, Jennifer AnnaHodson 216GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.265 (02)Panorama of German ThoughtTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM, W 5:00PM - 6:00PMDornbach, MartonGilman 313GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT
AS.150.491 (01)American Philosophy: PragmatismF 1:30PM - 4:00PMWilliams, MichaelGilman 288PHIL-LOGSCI
AS.150.219 (01)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, HilaryRemsen Hall 1PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (04)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PMBok, HilaryRemsen Hall 1PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (02)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, HilaryRemsen Hall 1PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (05)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, HilaryRemsen Hall 1PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.201 (04)Introduction to Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PMBett, Richard PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.150.219 (06)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMBok, HilaryRemsen Hall 1PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.201 (03)Introduction to Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBett, Richard PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.150.219 (03)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PMBok, HilaryRemsen Hall 1PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (14)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PMBok, HilaryRemsen Hall 1PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.481 (01)Hobbes' LeviathanTh 10:30AM - 1:00PMMelamed, Yitzhak YohananGilman 288PHIL-MODERN, INST-PT
AS.150.340 (01)The Philosophy of PsychologyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGunderson, Palmer JonShriver Hall 001PHIL-MIND, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.219 (12)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PMBok, HilaryRemsen Hall 1PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.464 (01)Hegel’s Philosophy of RightM 3:00PM - 5:30PMMoyar, DeanKrieger 180PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT
AS.150.219 (08)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PMBok, HilaryRemsen Hall 1PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.420 (01)Mathematical Logic ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRynasiewicz, RobertGilman 77
AS.150.219 (09)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 2:00PM - 2:50PMBok, HilaryRemsen Hall 1PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.433 (01)Philosophy of Space & TimeTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMRynasiewicz, RobertGilman 313
AS.150.219 (10)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 2:00PM - 2:50PMBok, HilaryRemsen Hall 1PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.418 (01)Hermeneutics and Critrical TheoryT 1:30PM - 4:00PMForster, EckartGilman 288
AS.150.219 (11)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, HilaryRemsen Hall 1PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.417 (01)Kant's 'Critique Of Pure Reason'TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMForster, EckartGilman 288
AS.150.219 (13)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMBok, HilaryRemsen Hall 1PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.434 (01)Formal Methods of PhilosophyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBledin, JustinGilman 132PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.301 (01)Majors Seminar: TruthW 1:30PM - 4:00PMTaylor, Elanor J.Krieger 306PHIL-SEM
AS.150.223 (01)Formal Methods of PhilosophyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBledin, JustinGilman 132PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.483 (01)Evidence, Foundations of Probability, and SpeculationW 1:30PM - 4:00PMAchinstein, PeterGilman 288PHIL-LOGSCI
AS.150.463 (01)The Value of Humanity and NatureW 4:15PM - 6:45PMPowell, Kevin MatthewGilman 288PHIL-ETHICS
AS.300.315 (01)Philosophical Conceptions of the InfiniteM 1:30PM - 4:00PMHost, Alexander StoltzfusGilman 208INST-PT
AS.300.309 (01)The Contemporary Philosophical NovelTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMLevi, Jacob EzraSmokler Center Library