Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

American Intellectual History since the Civil War
AS.100.295 (01)

Readings in American social thought since 1865, ranging across developments in philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Philosophy of Language Seminar: Proper Names and Definite Descriptions
AS.150.193 (01)

In talking with each other, we often use proper names like 'Juliet' and definite descriptions like 'The most beautiful fresco in Italy' to pick out persons and objects in our world. But what do these expressions mean exactly? In this seminar, we'll slowly and carefully work through some classic philosophical texts that address this issue. These texts will provide an introduction to the philosophy of language, and to analytic philosophy in general.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 10:00AM - 12:00PM
  • Instructor: Bledin, Justin
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND

American Intellectual History since the Civil War
AS.100.295 (02)

Readings in American social thought since 1865, ranging across developments in philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

American Intellectual History since the Civil War
AS.100.295 (03)

Readings in American social thought since 1865, ranging across developments in philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

American Intellectual History since the Civil War
AS.100.295 (04)

Readings in American social thought since 1865, ranging across developments in philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Introduction to Formal Logic
AS.150.118 (01)

An introduction to symbolic logic and probability. In the first two parts of the course we study formal ways of determining whether a conclusion of an argument follows from its premises. Included are truth-functional logic and predicate logic. In the third part we study the basic rules of probability, and learn how to make probability calculations and decisions in life. Co-listed with AS.150.632 (for graduate students) (01-F 11:00-11:50am).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/17
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND

Introduction to Formal Logic
AS.150.118 (02)

An introduction to symbolic logic and probability. In the first two parts of the course we study formal ways of determining whether a conclusion of an argument follows from its premises. Included are truth-functional logic and predicate logic. In the third part we study the basic rules of probability, and learn how to make probability calculations and decisions in life. Co-listed with AS.150.632 (for graduate students) (01-F 11:00-11:50am).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/17
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND

Introduction to Formal Logic
AS.150.118 (03)

An introduction to symbolic logic and probability. In the first two parts of the course we study formal ways of determining whether a conclusion of an argument follows from its premises. Included are truth-functional logic and predicate logic. In the third part we study the basic rules of probability, and learn how to make probability calculations and decisions in life. Co-listed with AS.150.632 (for graduate students) (01-F 11:00-11:50am).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/17
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND

Introduction to the History of Modern Philosophy
AS.150.205 (01)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Intro Hist of Mod Philos
AS.150.205 (02)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Intro Hist of Mod Philos
AS.150.205 (03)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Introduction to Moral Philosophy
AS.150.220 (03)

The class will serve as a high level introduction to moral philosophy. No background in philosophy is required. We examine three classic theories in normative ethics (virtue ethics, Kantian moral philosophy, and consequentialism), and challenges to those theories. We also cover topics in meta-ethics (with a focus on reasons and values).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Introduction to Moral Philosophy
AS.150.220 (05)

The class will serve as a high level introduction to moral philosophy. No background in philosophy is required. We examine three classic theories in normative ethics (virtue ethics, Kantian moral philosophy, and consequentialism), and challenges to those theories. We also cover topics in meta-ethics (with a focus on reasons and values).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Introduction to Moral Philosophy
AS.150.220 (04)

The class will serve as a high level introduction to moral philosophy. No background in philosophy is required. We examine three classic theories in normative ethics (virtue ethics, Kantian moral philosophy, and consequentialism), and challenges to those theories. We also cover topics in meta-ethics (with a focus on reasons and values).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Introduction to Moral Philosophy
AS.150.220 (01)

The class will serve as a high level introduction to moral philosophy. No background in philosophy is required. We examine three classic theories in normative ethics (virtue ethics, Kantian moral philosophy, and consequentialism), and challenges to those theories. We also cover topics in meta-ethics (with a focus on reasons and values).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Introduction to Moral Philosophy
AS.150.220 (02)

The class will serve as a high level introduction to moral philosophy. No background in philosophy is required. We examine three classic theories in normative ethics (virtue ethics, Kantian moral philosophy, and consequentialism), and challenges to those theories. We also cover topics in meta-ethics (with a focus on reasons and values).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Introduction to Formal Logic
AS.150.118 (04)

An introduction to symbolic logic and probability. In the first two parts of the course we study formal ways of determining whether a conclusion of an argument follows from its premises. Included are truth-functional logic and predicate logic. In the third part we study the basic rules of probability, and learn how to make probability calculations and decisions in life. Co-listed with AS.150.632 (for graduate students) (01-F 11:00-11:50am).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/17
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND

Prometheus Editorial Workshop
AS.150.300 (01)

Prometheus is an international undergraduate philosophy journal published by students at Johns Hopkins University. The purpose of the journal is to promote philosophic discourse of the highest standard by offering students an opportunity to engage in open discussion, participate in the production and publication of an academic journal, and establish a community of aspiring philosophers. Students enrolled in this workshop will act as the staff readers for the journal. For more information, please visit www.prometheus-journal.com. Prerequisite: MUST have taken one philosophy course.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 7:00PM - 8:00PM
  • Instructor: Heath, Austin E
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Biggest Hits in Philosophy of Science (20th and 21st Centuries)
AS.150.458 (01)

Readings from Duhem, Carnap, Hempel, Popper, Quine, Kuhn, Feyerabend, van Fraassen, and others who got us where we are in the field today. Quine said: Philosophy of science is philosophy enough. Is it?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN

The Idea of Power
AS.150.404 (01)

The Idea of Power surveys seminal texts in the history of political thought on the nature, promise, and dangers of political and social power; it also critically engages contemporary texts on race and gender power relations

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room: Maryland 202
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS

Introduction to Metaphysics
AS.150.260 (01)

Metaphysics addresses fundamental questions about the nature and structure of reality. This course will offer an introduction to metaphysics, and a survey of metaphysical debates about topics including time, causation, personal identity, God and free will.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Taylor, Elanor J.
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MIND

Mathematical Logic II
AS.150.421 (01)

Gödel's two incompleteness theorems regarding, first the Euclid set a precedent for the codification of mathematics by axiomatizing the set of geometric truths. An obvious question that arises is whether all branches of mathematics are axiomatizable, especially fundamental ones, such as arithmetic. In the late nineteenth century, what became known as Peano arithmetic was proposed as an axiomatization. The essential feature of an axiomatization is that, although one might have an infinite number of axioms, as does Peano arithmetic, one must have a decision procedure for determining whether a given proposition is or is not an axiom. In 1931, Gödel proved the astounding result that, not only is Peano arithmetic incomplete in the sense that it does not entail all arithmetic truths, but any attempted axiomatization of arithmetic is incomplete, and thus the set of arithmetic truths must be undecidable. Subsequently, Alfred Tarski showed the set of arithmetic truths is not even definable. Also, by finding a finitely axiomatizable undecidable subtheory of Peano arithmetic, Alonzo Church was able to show that there is not even an effective procedure for determining whether a given sentence is a logical truth. Finally, in his 1931 paper, Gödel argued a second incompleteness theorem, viz., that any theory strong enough to express its own consistency, as he showed Peano arithmetic to be, cannot prove its own consistency unless it is inconsistent. We will cover these and other results that have had a profound effect on the foundations of mathematics. It remains an open question whether so basic a theory as Peano arithmetic is consistent.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rynasiewicz, Robert
  • Room: Shaffer 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Decisions, Games & Social Choice
AS.150.330 (01)

We investigate rational decision making at the individual and group level. In the first section of the course on decision theory, we consider how a single rational agent will act in a choice situation given her knowledge, or lack thereof, about the world and her particular risk profile. In the second section on game theory, we explore different kinds of competitive and cooperative strategic interactions between agents, and we define different kinds of solutions, or equilibria, of these games. We also apply game theory to the study of morality, convention, and the social contract. In the final section of the course on social choice theory, we turn to group decision making with a focus on the impossibility results of Arrow and Sen.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Bledin, Justin
  • Room: Shaffer 303
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/50
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND

Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit
AS.150.430 (01)

An in-depth study of Hegel's masterpiece, the Phenomenology of Spirit. We will be concentrating on the first half of the text.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 9:00AM - 11:30AM
  • Instructor: Forster, Eckart
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Philosophy of Gender
AS.150.436 (01)

In this class we will examine philosophical questions about gender, and about the intersections between gender and other social categories including race, class and sexuality. We will focus specifically on questions about the metaphysics of gender and other social categories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Taylor, Elanor J.
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MIND

What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, Trees
AS.300.402 (01)

Knowing who or what counts as a person seems straightforward, until we consider the many kinds of creatures, objects, and artificial beings that have been granted—or demanded or denied—that status. This course investigates recent debates about being a person in literature and law. Questions examined will include: Should trees have standing? Can corporations have religious beliefs? Could a robot sign a contract? Although our explorations will be focused on these questions, the genre of materials examined will be wide-ranging (including legal essays, philosophy, contemporary novels, and film). Texts will include novels by William Gibson and Lydia Millet, essays by John Dewey and Daniel Dennett, and films such as Ex Machinaand Her.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Siraganian, Lisa Michele
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Moral Imagination
AS.150.486 (01)

This course explores the relationship between moral principles and how we use imagination to put or fail to put principles to work. We will read widely and eclectically in exploring this relationship.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room: Wolman MPR
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Themes in Medieval Islamic Thought
AS.194.401 (01)

This seminar examines medieval Muslim thinkers who addressed themes at the intersection of theology, philosophy, science, and ethics: the definition of the nature of God’s attributes, His uniqueness, transcendence and omnipotence; human freewill and the limits of human knowledge; the nature of the world; and the relationship among reason, religion, and science. The course will look at how these and other crucial themes were addressed by major medieval philosophers and philosophical schools not only in Islam, but also in Judaism and Christianity, and highlight similarities and differences among the three major monotheistic faiths.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Ferrario, Gabriele
  • Room: Gilman 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST

Plato's Republic
AS.150.492 (01)

This course will be a close reading of Plato's Republic, with special attention to the parallel of city and soul, the relevance of metaphysics to politics, and the relation of aristocracy, democracy and tyranny.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Moyar, Dean
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

The Existential Drama: Philosophy and Theatre of the Absurd
AS.225.328 (01)

Existentialism, a powerful movement in modern drama and theatre, has had a profound influence on contemporary political thought, ethics, and psychology, and has transformed our very notion of how to stage a play. Selected readings and lectures on the philosophy of Kierkegaard, Nietszche, Camus and Sartre -- and discussion of works for the stage by Sartre, Ionesco, Genet, Beckett, Albee, Pinter, Athol Fugard (with Nkani & Nshone), Heiner Müller and the late plays of Caryl Churchill. Opportunities for projects on Dürrenmatt, Frisch, Havel, Witkiewicz, and Mrozek.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Martin, Joseph H
  • Room: Merrick 105
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Death and Dying
AS.150.480 (01)

What is death? How should we think about death? How should we think about it? How should we treat those who are dying including ourselves? This course will examine these and other philosophical questions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Food Ethics
AS.150.482 (01)

Eating is an essential human activity: we need to eat to survive. But how should we eat? In this course, we consider such ethical questions as: Is it morally wrong to make animals suffer and to kill them in order to eat them? What is the extent of hunger and food insecurity, in this country and globally, and what should we as individuals do about it? Should the government try to influence our food choices, to make them healthier?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Barnhill, Anne Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Introduction to Metaphysics
AS.150.260 (02)

Metaphysics addresses fundamental questions about the nature and structure of reality. This course will offer an introduction to metaphysics, and a survey of metaphysical debates about topics including time, causation, personal identity, God and free will.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Taylor, Elanor J.
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MIND

Intro Hist of Mod Philos
AS.150.205 (04)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Introduction to Moral Philosophy
AS.150.220 (06)

The class will serve as a high level introduction to moral philosophy. No background in philosophy is required. We examine three classic theories in normative ethics (virtue ethics, Kantian moral philosophy, and consequentialism), and challenges to those theories. We also cover topics in meta-ethics (with a focus on reasons and values).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/10
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.295 (01)American Intellectual History since the Civil WarMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBurgin, AngusGilman 50HIST-US
AS.150.193 (01)Philosophy of Language Seminar: Proper Names and Definite DescriptionsF 10:00AM - 12:00PMBledin, JustinGilman 288COGS-PHLMND
AS.100.295 (02)American Intellectual History since the Civil WarMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMBurgin, AngusGilman 50HIST-US
AS.100.295 (03)American Intellectual History since the Civil WarMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBurgin, AngusGilman 50HIST-US
AS.100.295 (04)American Intellectual History since the Civil WarMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMBurgin, AngusGilman 50HIST-US
AS.150.118 (01)Introduction to Formal LogicMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMAchinstein, PeterGilman 50PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.118 (02)Introduction to Formal LogicMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMAchinstein, PeterGilman 50PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.118 (03)Introduction to Formal LogicMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMAchinstein, PeterGilman 50PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.205 (01)Introduction to the History of Modern PhilosophyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMWilliams, MichaelLevering ArellanoPHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.205 (02)Intro Hist of Mod PhilosMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMWilliams, MichaelLevering ArellanoPHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.205 (03)Intro Hist of Mod PhilosMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMWilliams, MichaelLevering ArellanoPHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.220 (03)Introduction to Moral PhilosophyMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, HilaryGilman 50PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.220 (05)Introduction to Moral PhilosophyMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMBok, HilaryGilman 50PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.220 (04)Introduction to Moral PhilosophyMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMBok, HilaryGilman 50PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.220 (01)Introduction to Moral PhilosophyMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, HilaryGilman 50PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.220 (02)Introduction to Moral PhilosophyMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, HilaryGilman 50PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.118 (04)Introduction to Formal LogicMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMAchinstein, PeterGilman 50PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.300 (01)Prometheus Editorial WorkshopT 7:00PM - 8:00PMHeath, Austin EGilman 288
AS.150.458 (01)The Biggest Hits in Philosophy of Science (20th and 21st Centuries)W 1:30PM - 4:00PMAchinstein, PeterGilman 132PHIL-MODERN
AS.150.404 (01)The Idea of PowerTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLebron, Christopher JosephMaryland 202INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.260 (01)Introduction to MetaphysicsMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMTaylor, Elanor J.Gilman 17PHIL-MIND
AS.150.421 (01)Mathematical Logic IITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRynasiewicz, RobertShaffer 303
AS.150.330 (01)Decisions, Games & Social ChoiceTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBledin, JustinShaffer 303COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.430 (01)Hegel's Phenomenology of SpiritTh 9:00AM - 11:30AMForster, EckartGilman 288
AS.150.436 (01)Philosophy of GenderMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMTaylor, Elanor J.Gilman 288PHIL-MIND
AS.300.402 (01)What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, TreesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMSiraganian, Lisa MicheleGilman 208
AS.150.486 (01)Moral ImaginationT 1:30PM - 4:00PMLebron, Christopher JosephWolman MPRPHIL-ETHICS
AS.194.401 (01)Themes in Medieval Islamic ThoughtW 3:00PM - 5:30PMFerrario, GabrieleGilman 300ISLM-ISLMST
AS.150.492 (01)Plato's RepublicT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMoyar, DeanGilman 400INST-PT
AS.225.328 (01)The Existential Drama: Philosophy and Theatre of the AbsurdM 3:00PM - 5:30PMMartin, Joseph HMerrick 105
AS.150.480 (01)Death and DyingF 1:30PM - 4:00PMBok, HilaryAmes 218
AS.150.482 (01)Food EthicsW 1:30PM - 4:00PMBarnhill, Anne ElizabethGilman 288ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.150.260 (02)Introduction to MetaphysicsMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMTaylor, Elanor J.Gilman 17PHIL-MIND
AS.150.205 (04)Intro Hist of Mod PhilosMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMWilliams, MichaelLevering ArellanoPHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.220 (06)Introduction to Moral PhilosophyMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMBok, HilaryGilman 50PHIL-ETHICS