Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Introduction To Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (04)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Freshman Seminar: The Greeks and Their Emotions
AS.040.109 (01)

This seminar is meant as an introduction to the study of ancient emotions, with a particular emphasis on how the ancient Greeks conceptualized, portrayed and lived their emotions through linguistic, literary and artistic expression. After an analysis of how the ancient Greek emotional experience differs from our own, we shall focus on the phenomenon of emotion as deeply rooted in the physical body, and in light of this we will contemplate (and question) its universality. You will also learn how to research and write a paper. Texts will be read in translation. No knowledge of ancient Greek required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Asuni, Michele
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (02)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. The course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (01)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Introduction To Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (01)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (03)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. The course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (04)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. The course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (01)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. The course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM

Introduction To Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (03)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Introduction To Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (02)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (02)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Philosophy of Mind
AS.150.245 (01)

Our minds are often thought to be exhaustively and intimately known to us. Despite this philosophers deeply disagree about the natures of the mental states and events which make up our minds. And there is equally little agreement as to what makes such states and events count as mental in the first place. This course will investigate the nature of different aspects of mind and their interrelations. Students will explore debates and puzzles about the nature of perception, memory, imagination, dreaming, pain and bodily sensation, emotion, action, volition and those states commonly classed as propositional attitudes: knowledge, belief, desire and intention. This will put us in a position to ask what if anything unifies such phenomena as mental.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Phillips, Ian B
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-MIND

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (10)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 2:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Philosophy of Mind
AS.150.245 (02)

Our minds are often thought to be exhaustively and intimately known to us. Despite this philosophers deeply disagree about the natures of the mental states and events which make up our minds. And there is equally little agreement as to what makes such states and events count as mental in the first place. This course will investigate the nature of different aspects of mind and their interrelations. Students will explore debates and puzzles about the nature of perception, memory, imagination, dreaming, pain and bodily sensation, emotion, action, volition and those states commonly classed as propositional attitudes: knowledge, belief, desire and intention. This will put us in a position to ask what if anything unifies such phenomena as mental.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Phillips, Ian B
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-MIND

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (13)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (11)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (05)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (03)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (07)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (06)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Philosophy of Law
AS.150.355 (01)

In this course we will examine major issues in the philosophy of law, including the nature of law, the role of the Constitution in legal decisions, and the justification of punishment. No previous knowledge of law or philosophy is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Moyar, Dean
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS

Theory of Knowledge
AS.150.423 (01)

An advanced introduction to the central problems, concepts and theories of contemporary philosophical epistemology (theory of knowledge). Topics to be explored will includes: what is knowledge (and why do we want it)?; theories of justification (foundationalism, the coherence theory, etc.); externalism and internalism in epistemology; skepticism, relativism and how to avoid them. Reading from contemporary sources.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-MIND

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (09)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 2:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Philosophy and Disability
AS.150.426 (01)

In this course, we will consider various philosophical issues related to disability. What counts as a disability? What obligations do we have, both as individuals and as a society, to people with disabilities? What counts as respecting people with disabilities, and what counts as unjustifiable discrimination against them?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS

Themes from the Philosophy of Religion
AS.150.331 (01)

Religion has always been a contested and extensively debated topic throughout the history of philosophy, and the topics from the philosophy of religion are still relevant today. In this course, we will look at several of those topics: what is religion? Do we have reason to believe or not believe in God? How does God relate to the world (or are there many Gods)? How can we understand religious practice? And what role (if any) should religion play in our society?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Lossau, Jens Tammo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS, PHIL-MIND

Modal Logic and Its Applications
AS.150.498 (01)

In the first part of the course, we'll investigate the theory of modal logic, considering its syntax, semantics, and proof theory. We'll then turn to some its philosophical applications: epistemic logic, counterfactuals, deontic logic, intuitionistic logic, and the metaphysics of time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Bledin, Justin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI

Classics of Analytic Philosophy
AS.150.473 (01)

A reading of some of the classic philosophical works in 20th Century Analytic Philosophy, beginning with G. Frege and ending with V.O. Quine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Philosophy and Cognitive Science
AS.150.476 (01)

This year's topic is perception. Questions will include: In what ways might perceptual states be like and unlike pictures? Does what we believe affect what we perceive? Is linguistic comprehension a kind of perception?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Gross, Steven
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-MIND

Moral Imagination
AS.150.486 (01)

This course explores the relationship between moral principles and how we use imagination to put or fail to put principles to work. We will read widely and eclectically in exploring this relationship.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Evidence, Foundations of Probability, and Speculation
AS.150.483 (01)

The course examines major theories about the meaning of evidence and probability, and in terms of these provides answers to the questions “What is a scientific speculation?” and “When, if at all, is speculating important or even legitimate in science?” No preview study of evidence or probability is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI

Panorama of German Thought
AS.211.265 (02)

This course introduces students to major figures and trends in German literature and thought from the sixteenth to the twentieth century. We will pay particular attention to the evolution of German political thought from the Protestant Reformation to the foundation of the German Federal Republic after WWII. How did the Protestant Reformation affect the understanding of the state, rights, civic institutions, and temporal authority in Germany? How did German Enlightenment thinkers conceive of ethics and politics or morality and rights? How do German writers define the nation, community, and the people or das Volk? What is the link between romanticism and nationalism? To what degree is political economy, as developed by Marx, a critical response to romanticism? How did German thinkers conceive of power and force in the wake of World Wars I and II? What are the ties that bind and rend a community in this tradition? We will consider these and related questions in this course through careful readings of selected works.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Tobias, Rochelle
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/3
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL

Plato's Myths
AS.150.328 (01)

Much attention has been paid to Plato's logoi (arguments). Less attention has been paid to his mythoi (stories). In this course we will examine Plato's myths and their relation to his deductive arguments. We will encounter stories about the Greek gods, love, the soul, and the afterlife. We will read the Euthyphro, the Symposium, the Apology, the Phaedo, the Republic, and secondary literature on these dialogues. No previous coursework in philosophy is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Cummings, Cara Rei
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Existentialism in Literature and Philosophy
AS.213.374 (01)

This course explores the themes of existentialism, including the meaning of existence, the nature of the self, authenticity and inauthenticity, the inescapability of death, the experience of time, anxiety, freedom and responsibility to others, in literary and philosophical works. It will be examined why these philosophical ideas often seem to demand literary expression, or bear a close relation to literary works. Readings may include writings by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, Heidegger, Rilke, Kafka, Simmel, Jaspers, Buber, Sartre, de Beauvoir, and Camus.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Gosetti, Jennifer Anna
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Cinema and Philosophy
AS.300.399 (01)

Do movies have anything to say about philosophical problems? Why is contemporary philosophy so interested in cinema? What are the most productive ways of bringing films and philosophy into conversation?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Marrati, Paola
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Feminist and Queer Theory: Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality-Intersectional Feminist Theory
AS.363.306 (01)

In this course, we will get to know intersectional feminist philosophy through the lens of a Black feminist epistemology. What does this mean? That means that we will focus on how the contributions of Black feminist authors can bring out the specific political and philosophical nature of an intersectional theoretical framework.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Hussein, Rima
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Feminism
AS.365.100 (06)

Women as a group, in comparison with men, hold less political and economic power, work more hours while being paid less, and are more likely to be victims of domestic violence and sexual assault and harassment. These differences are dramatic and are historically and geographically widespread. Feminists are people who find this state of affairs objectionable, and who wonder how it was brought about, how it is maintained, and what can be done to ameliorate it. Philosophers are people who ask questions that can seem to non-philosophers to be very elementary (however interesting and hard they may actually be). This course surveys some philosophical contributions to feminism. Our questions will include: What is oppression? sexism? objectification? Can family structures be just or unjust? What is it to be a person (in the moral sense)? What is it to be autonomous in the sphere of reproduction? What are women? What is gender? And the like.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 9:00AM - 11:30AM
  • Instructor: Kosch, Michelle
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/14
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Moral Relativism
AS.365.100 (05)

Moral disagreement is a puzzling phenomenon, and perhaps a deep one that tells us something about the nature of morality. One familiar response to apparently irresolvable moral disagreements is moral relativism: the view that what is right and wrong is somehow relative to individuals, or to cultures. But even if we reject relativism, the question how we know what we know about morality remains: if we can say nothing on this score, we might end up moral skeptics. We shall look at some recent research in moral psychology (including the evolutionary perspective on morality) to help us understand where our moral judgments come from, and to what extent we can trust them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Korzukhin, Theodore M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/14
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Trust: Literature and Philosophy
AS.213.271 (01)

Fake news, policing crises, political polarization, and the like challenge us to reevaluate the notion of trust. The course takes up this challenge with the help of both literary and philosophical texts that shall assist us in posing, and trying to answer, questions such as the following: What or whom should we trust (ourselves, others, neither)? Is it possible and sometimes even preferable not to trust? Or should we cultivate trust in society? If so, how? Authors may include ETA Hoffmann, Hegel, Nietzsche, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Yonover, Jason Maurice
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Philosophy and Infinity.
AS.300.223 (01)

What is the infinite? Can we comprehend it? Can we experience it? In this course we will explore various ways in which philosophers in the western tradition have answered questions such as these. In the first half of the semester, we will examine theoretical treatments of the infinite that inform how we understand the fabric of our world, from the ordinary objects around us to more sublime concepts of God, space, time, and mathematics. In the second half, we will turn to arguments in aesthetics and ethics that reveal an interplay between infinity and finitude occurring before our very eyes. Philosophers we will cover include Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Kant, Hegel, Russell, Levinas, and Arendt. Throughout, we will ask such fundamental questions as, what is the starting point of philosophy? what is its methodology? what can it achieve in terms of knowledge? and in terms of practice?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Host, Alexander Stoltzfus
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Trust: Literature and Philosophy
AS.213.271 (02)

Fake news, policing crises, political polarization, and the like challenge us to reevaluate the notion of trust. The course takes up this challenge with the help of both literary and philosophical texts that shall assist us in posing, and trying to answer, questions such as the following: What or whom should we trust (ourselves, others, neither)? Is it possible and sometimes even preferable not to trust? Or should we cultivate trust in society? If so, how? Authors may include ETA Hoffmann, Hegel, Nietzsche, and others.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Yonover, Jason Maurice
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/3
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.150.201 (04)Introduction To Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PMBett, Richard PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.040.109 (01)Freshman Seminar: The Greeks and Their EmotionsTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMAsuni, Michele 
AS.150.136 (02)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMAchinstein, Peter COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (01)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, Hilary PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.201 (01)Introduction To Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBett, Richard PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.150.136 (03)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMAchinstein, Peter COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.136 (04)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMAchinstein, Peter COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.136 (01)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMAchinstein, Peter COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.201 (03)Introduction To Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBett, Richard PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.150.201 (02)Introduction To Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PMBett, Richard PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.150.219 (02)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, Hilary PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.245 (01)Philosophy of MindMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMPhillips, Ian B COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-MIND
AS.150.219 (10)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 2:00PM - 2:50PMBok, Hilary PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.245 (02)Philosophy of MindMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMPhillips, Ian B COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-MIND
AS.150.219 (13)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMBok, Hilary PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (11)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, Hilary PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (05)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, Hilary PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (03)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PMBok, Hilary PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (07)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PMBok, Hilary PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (06)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMBok, Hilary PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.355 (01)Philosophy of LawM 1:30PM - 4:00PMMoyar, Dean INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.423 (01)Theory of KnowledgeM 1:30PM - 4:00PMWilliams, Michael COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-MIND
AS.150.219 (09)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 2:00PM - 2:50PMBok, Hilary PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.426 (01)Philosophy and DisabilityF 1:30PM - 4:00PMBok, Hilary PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.331 (01)Themes from the Philosophy of ReligionTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLossau, Jens Tammo PHIL-ETHICS, PHIL-MIND
AS.150.498 (01)Modal Logic and Its ApplicationsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBledin, Justin COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI
AS.150.473 (01)Classics of Analytic PhilosophyF 1:30PM - 4:00PMWilliams, Michael 
AS.150.476 (01)Philosophy and Cognitive ScienceT 1:30PM - 4:00PMGross, Steven COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-MIND
AS.150.486 (01)Moral ImaginationLebron, Christopher Joseph PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.483 (01)Evidence, Foundations of Probability, and SpeculationW 1:30PM - 4:00PMAchinstein, Peter PHIL-LOGSCI
AS.211.265 (02)Panorama of German ThoughtWF 12:00PM - 1:15PMTobias, Rochelle GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL
AS.150.328 (01)Plato's MythsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMCummings, Cara Rei PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.213.374 (01)Existentialism in Literature and PhilosophyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMGosetti, Jennifer Anna GRLL-ENGL
AS.300.399 (01)Cinema and PhilosophyMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMarrati, Paola 
AS.363.306 (01)Feminist and Queer Theory: Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality-Intersectional Feminist TheoryM 4:00PM - 6:30PMHussein, Rima 
AS.365.100 (06)FeminismW 9:00AM - 11:30AMKosch, Michelle 
AS.365.100 (05)Moral RelativismM 4:00PM - 6:30PMKorzukhin, Theodore M 
AS.213.271 (01)Trust: Literature and PhilosophyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMYonover, Jason Maurice 
AS.300.223 (01)Philosophy and Infinity.T 1:30PM - 4:00PMHost, Alexander Stoltzfus 
AS.213.271 (02)Trust: Literature and PhilosophyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PMYonover, Jason Maurice