Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

FYS: The Physics of Democracy
AS.001.142 (01)

This First-Year Seminar considers what we can learn about democratic societies by thinking of them as complex physical systems. We will discuss voting and social choice theories and their relationship to renormalization and emergence; organization and segregation in complex systems: power laws, inequality, and polarization; and the dynamics of information and opinions: networks, bubbles, filters, and phase transitions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Carroll, Sean Michael
  • Room: Bloomberg 259
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: Skepticism - Ancient, Modern, Contemporary
AS.001.188 (01)

Can we gain knowledge of reality, or is everything a matter of opinion? Does it matter? Why do we want (or need) knowledge anyway? Questions like this have been the stock in trade of philosophical skeptics throughout the entire history of our Western philosophical tradition. This First-Year Seminar will involve close readings of some classic works on the topic of skepticism with a view to understanding some of the main arguments for (and against) skepticism: how they work and how they may have changed over time. Readings include selections from Sextus Empiricus, Descartes, Hume and Wittgenstein.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 10:30AM - 1:00PM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Life and Death
AS.150.125 (01)

This course will address some of the Big Picture questions about human life using the methods of analytic philosophy. These questions include: What am I, and what kinds of things could happen to me before I'd no longer be me? Should I be afraid of death? Is it better to be than to never have been anything at all? When is it permissible to end a life? To what extent do I live my life freely?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Holguín, Ben Walton
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, PHIL-MIND

Life and Death
AS.150.125 (02)

This course will address some of the Big Picture questions about human life using the methods of analytic philosophy. These questions include: What am I, and what kinds of things could happen to me before I'd no longer be me? Should I be afraid of death? Is it better to be than to never have been anything at all? When is it permissible to end a life? To what extent do I live my life freely?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Holguín, Ben Walton
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, PHIL-MIND

Life and Death
AS.150.125 (03)

This course will address some of the Big Picture questions about human life using the methods of analytic philosophy. These questions include: What am I, and what kinds of things could happen to me before I'd no longer be me? Should I be afraid of death? Is it better to be than to never have been anything at all? When is it permissible to end a life? To what extent do I live my life freely?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Holguín, Ben Walton
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, PHIL-MIND

Life and Death
AS.150.125 (04)

This course will address some of the Big Picture questions about human life using the methods of analytic philosophy. These questions include: What am I, and what kinds of things could happen to me before I'd no longer be me? Should I be afraid of death? Is it better to be than to never have been anything at all? When is it permissible to end a life? To what extent do I live my life freely?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Holguín, Ben Walton
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, PHIL-MIND

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (01)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. The course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/19
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (02)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. The course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/19
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (03)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. The course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/19
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (04)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. The course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/19
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM

Introduction To Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (01)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard
  • Room: Hodson 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/19
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Introduction To Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (02)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard
  • Room: Hodson 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Introduction To Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (03)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard
  • Room: Hodson 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/19
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (01)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (02)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (03)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (04)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (05)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (06)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (07)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (08)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (09)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (10)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (11)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (12)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Philosophy of Mind
AS.150.245 (01)

If we know anything, it is natural to think it is our own minds. Despite this, philosophers have long disagreed about the natures of the states which make up our minds. And there is equally little agreement as to what makes such states count as mental in the first place. This course will investigate the nature of different aspects of mind and their interrelations. Time permitting, we will explore debates and puzzles about perception, memory, imagination, dreaming, pain and bodily sensation, emotion, action, volition and those states commonly classed as propositional attitudes: knowledge, belief, desire and intention. This will put us in a position to ask what if anything unifies such phenomena as mental

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Phillips, Ian B
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, PHIL-MIND, COGS-PHLMND

Philosophy of Mind
AS.150.245 (02)

If we know anything, it is natural to think it is our own minds. Despite this, philosophers have long disagreed about the natures of the states which make up our minds. And there is equally little agreement as to what makes such states count as mental in the first place. This course will investigate the nature of different aspects of mind and their interrelations. Time permitting, we will explore debates and puzzles about perception, memory, imagination, dreaming, pain and bodily sensation, emotion, action, volition and those states commonly classed as propositional attitudes: knowledge, belief, desire and intention. This will put us in a position to ask what if anything unifies such phenomena as mental

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 4:30PM - 5:15PM
  • Instructor: Phillips, Ian B
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, PHIL-MIND, COGS-PHLMND

Tragedy and Living Well
AS.150.406 (01)

This course revisits the idea of tragedy as represented in Ancient Greek thought for the purpose of approaching questions of flourishing and ethical living from a different angle.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room: Maryland 104
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN, PHIL-ETHICS, PHIL-SEM

Theory of Knowledge
AS.150.423 (01)

An advanced introduction to the central problems, concepts and theories of contemporary philosophical epistemology (theory of knowledge). Topics to be explored will includes: what is knowledge (and why do we want it)?; theories of justification (foundationalism, the coherence theory, etc.); externalism and internalism in epistemology; skepticism, relativism and how to avoid them. Reading from contemporary sources.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Holguín, Ben Walton
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MIND

Philosophy and Disability
AS.150.426 (01)

In this course, we will consider various philosophical issues related to disability. What counts as a disability? What obligations do we have, both as individuals and as a society, to people with disabilities? What counts as respecting people with disabilities, and what counts as unjustifiable discrimination against them?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, MSCH-HUM

Spinoza’s Theological Political Treatise
AS.150.428 (01)

The course is an in-depth study of Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise. Among the topics to be discussed are: Spinoza’s Bible criticism, the nature of religion, philosophy and faith, the nature of the ancient Hebrew State, Spinoza’s theory of the State, the role of religion in Spinoza’s political theory, the freedom to philosophize, the metaphysics of Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise, and finally, the reception of the TTP.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Melamed, Yitzhak Yohanan
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, PHIL-MODERN

Topics in the Philosophy of Physics
AS.150.465 (02)

This course will consider some philosophical topics in the foundations of physics. Entropy and the arrow of time -- why time has a direction, whether it can be explained in terms of entropy, and what role the arrow of time plays in causation and emergence. Anthropics and indexical uncertainty -- approaches to probability, reference classes, the cosmological multiverse, Boltzmann brains, simulation and doomsday arguments. Foundations of quantum mechanics -- the measurement problem, many-worlds, probability and structure, alternative approaches.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Carroll, Sean Michael
  • Room: Krieger 304
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM

The Nature and Significance of Animal Minds
AS.150.475 (01)

Humans have a complicated relationship with other animals. We love them, befriend them and save them. We hunt, farm and eat them. We experiment on and observe them to discover more about them and to discover more about ourselves. For many of us, our pets are amongst the most familiar inhabitants of our world. Yet when we try to imagine what is going on in a dog or cat’s mind — let alone that of a crow, octopus or bee — many of us are either stumped about how to go about this, or (the science strongly suggests) get things radically wrong. Is our thought about and behaviour towards animals ethically permissible, or even consistent? Can we reshape our habits of thought about animals to allow for a more rational, richer relationship with the other inhabitants of our planet? In this course, students will reflect on two closely intertwined questions: an ethical question, what sort of relationship ought we to have with animals?; and a metaphysical question, what is the nature of animal minds? Readings will primarily be from philosophy and ethics and the cognitive sciences, with additional readings from literature and biology. There are no prerequisites for this class. It will be helpful but certainly not necessary to have taken previous classes in philosophy (especially ethics and philosophy of mind) or in cognitive science

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Brown, Simon Alexander Burns
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MIND, PHIL-ETHICS, PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM

Food Ethics
AS.150.482 (01)

Eating is an essential human activity: we need to eat to survive. But how should we eat? In this course, we consider such ethical questions as: Is it morally wrong to make animals suffer and to kill them in order to eat them? What is the extent of hunger and food insecurity, in this country and globally, and what should we as individuals do about it? Should the government try to influence our food choices, to make them healthier?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Barnhill, Anne
  • Room: Smokler Center 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/19
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH

Panorama of German Thought
AS.211.265 (01)

This course introduces students to major figures and trends in German literature and thought from the sixteenth to the twentieth century. We will pay particular attention to the evolution of German political thought from the Protestant Reformation to the foundation of the German Federal Republic after WWII. How did the Protestant Reformation affect the understanding of the state, rights, civic institutions, and temporal authority in Germany? How did German Enlightenment thinkers conceive of ethics and politics or morality and rights? How do German writers define the nation, community, and the people or das Volk? What is the link between romanticism and nationalism? To what degree is political economy, as developed by Marx, a critical response to romanticism? How did German thinkers conceive of power and force in the wake of World Wars I and II? What are the ties that bind as well as divide a community in this tradition? We will consider these and related questions in this course through careful readings of selected works.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Tobias, Rochelle
  • Room: Gilman 10
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Existentialism in Literature and Philosophy
AS.213.374 (01)

What does it mean to exist, and to be able to reflect on this fact? What is it mean to be a self? This course explores the themes of existentialism in literature and philosophy, including the meaning of existence, the nature of the self, authenticity and inauthenticity, the inescapability of death, the experience of time, anxiety, absurdity, freedom and responsibility to others. It will be examined why these philosophical ideas often seem to demand literary expression or bear a close relation to literary works. Readings may include writings by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, Heidegger, Rilke, Kafka, Simmel, Jaspers, Buber, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Camus, and Daoud.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Gosetti, Jennifer Anna
  • Room: Smokler Center 213
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): MLL-GERM, MLL-ENGL

Existentialism in Literature and Philosophy
AS.213.374 (02)

What does it mean to exist, and to be able to reflect on this fact? What is it mean to be a self? This course explores the themes of existentialism in literature and philosophy, including the meaning of existence, the nature of the self, authenticity and inauthenticity, the inescapability of death, the experience of time, anxiety, absurdity, freedom and responsibility to others. It will be examined why these philosophical ideas often seem to demand literary expression or bear a close relation to literary works. Readings may include writings by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, Heidegger, Rilke, Kafka, Simmel, Jaspers, Buber, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Camus, and Daoud.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Gosetti, Jennifer Anna
  • Room: Smokler Center 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/5
  • PosTag(s): MLL-GERM, MLL-ENGL

Dante Visits the Afterlife
AS.214.479 (01)

One of the greatest works of literature of all times, the Divine Comedy leads us down into the torture-pits of Hell, up the steep mountain terrain of Purgatory, through the “virtual” space of Paradise, and then back to where we began: our own earthly lives. We accompany Dante on his journey, building along the way knowledge of medieval Italian history, literature, philosophy, politics, and religion. The course also focuses on the arts of reading deeply, asking questions of a text, and interpreting literary and scholarly works through discussion and critical writing. Conducted in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Saiber, Arielle
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

The Concept of Time
AS.300.351 (01)

The purpose of this course is to ask the most important questions concerning the concept of time. What is time? Does time exist? Is it a fundamental aspect of the cosmos or just an illusion of human perception? Do different cultures, historical periods, or individuals have unique conceptions of time? Or are there universal aspects of time that transcend our differences? Do animals perceive time or is the perception of time a uniquely human phenomenon? Is time travel possible? The history of philosophy, both Western and Eastern, provides an array of different answers to these and other fundamental questions related to time. Additionally, there is much contemporary research on the concept that is entirely original. In the past four decades, time has been a major interdisciplinary theme, often bringing together humanists and scientists fascinated by its paradoxes. The guiding concern of this course will be to diagnose those aspects of time that are most relevant to us. What can we add to what has been written about time? Does our unique place in time—post COVID-19 pandemic, on the verge of a possible Third World War—prepare us in any specific way to examine the concept? The syllabus for the course will juxtapose canonical philosophical texts by some of the greatest thinkers of time with contemporary writings about time. The readings will support a problem-centered approach, exploring different possibilities for understanding the concept of time and different possible solutions for its many difficulties.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Souza Mendes, Paula
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Cinema and Philosophy
AS.300.399 (01)

What do films and philosophy have in common? Do films express, with their own means, philosophical problems that are relevant to our experience of ourselves and the world we live in? This term we will study such issues with a particular focus on questions of justice, truth, revenge, forgiveness, hope, hate, and fear.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marrati, Paola
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Theorizing Race and Mixed-Race in Asia and its Diasporas
AS.310.335 (01)

This class will explore the construction of race and its applications in Asia and its diasporas. Using the notion of “mixed-race” as an analytic, we will examine how the colonial origins of race and the ensuing Cold War have influenced concepts of national identity and belonging. Employing an inter-sectional approach towards race, gender, and sexuality, the course will draw on a variety of media including memoirs, archives, and videos, to contemplate the locus of race and mixed-race and their importance within the larger nexus of identity formation in Asia and its diasporas.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Reizman, Laura Ha Ha
  • Room: Mergenthaler 252
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Feminist and Queer Theory: Women in Western Thought an Introduction
AS.363.302 (01)

Women in Western Thought is an introduction to (the history of) Western thought from the margins of the canon. The class introduces you to some key philosophical question, focusing on some highlights of women’s thought in Western thought, most of which are commonly and unjustly neglected. The seminar will be organized around a number of paradigmatic cases, such as the mind/body question in Early Modern Europe, the declaration of the rights of (wo)men during the French revolution, the impact of slavery on philosophical thought, the MeToo debate and others. By doing so, the course will cover a range of issues, such as the nature of God, contract theory, slavery, standpoint epistemology, and queer feminist politics. Students will engage with questions about what a canon is, and who has a say in that. In this sense, Women in Western Thought introduces you to some crucial philosophical and political problems and makes you acquainted with some women in the field. The long term objective of a class on women in Western thought must be to empower, to inspire independence, and to resist the sanctioned ignorance often times masked as universal knowledge and universal history. People of all genders tend to suffer from misinformation regarding the role of women and the gender of thought more generally. By introducing you to women who took it upon themselves to resist the obstacles of their time, I am hoping to provide role models for your individual intellectual and political development. By introducing you to the historical conditions of the exclusion and oppression of women (including trans and queer women as well as black women and women of color), I hope to enable you to generate the sensitivities that are required to navigate the particular social relations of the diverse world you currently inhabit. By introducing philosophical topics in this way, I hope to enable you to have a positive, diversifying influence on you future endeavours.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: deLire, Luce Marcella
  • Room: Maryland 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, MSCH-HUM

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.001.142 (01)FYS: The Physics of DemocracyMW 10:30AM - 11:45AMCarroll, Sean MichaelBloomberg 259
AS.001.188 (01)FYS: Skepticism - Ancient, Modern, ContemporaryF 10:30AM - 1:00PMWilliams, MichaelGilman 134
AS.150.125 (01)Life and DeathMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMHolguín, Ben WaltonMudd 26MSCH-HUM, PHIL-MIND
AS.150.125 (02)Life and DeathMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMHolguín, Ben WaltonMudd 26MSCH-HUM, PHIL-MIND
AS.150.125 (03)Life and DeathMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMHolguín, Ben WaltonMudd 26MSCH-HUM, PHIL-MIND
AS.150.125 (04)Life and DeathMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMHolguín, Ben WaltonMudd 26MSCH-HUM, PHIL-MIND
AS.150.136 (01)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMAchinstein, PeterGilman 50COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.136 (02)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMAchinstein, PeterGilman 50COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.136 (03)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMAchinstein, PeterGilman 50COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.136 (04)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMAchinstein, PeterGilman 50COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.201 (01)Introduction To Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBett, RichardHodson 213PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.150.201 (02)Introduction To Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PMBett, RichardHodson 213PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.150.201 (03)Introduction To Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBett, RichardHodson 213PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.150.219 (01)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (02)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (03)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (04)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (05)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (06)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (07)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (08)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (09)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 4:00PM - 4:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (10)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 4:00PM - 4:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (11)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (12)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.245 (01)Philosophy of MindMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMPhillips, Ian BGilman 55MSCH-HUM, PHIL-MIND, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.245 (02)Philosophy of MindMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 4:30PM - 5:15PMPhillips, Ian BGilman 55MSCH-HUM, PHIL-MIND, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.406 (01)Tragedy and Living WellM 3:00PM - 5:30PMLebron, Christopher JosephMaryland 104PHIL-ANCIEN, PHIL-ETHICS, PHIL-SEM
AS.150.423 (01)Theory of KnowledgeTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHolguín, Ben WaltonGilman 288PHIL-MIND
AS.150.426 (01)Philosophy and DisabilityF 1:30PM - 4:00PMBok, HilaryGilman 288PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.428 (01)Spinoza’s Theological Political TreatiseW 4:00PM - 6:30PMMelamed, Yitzhak YohananGilman 288INST-PT, PHIL-MODERN
AS.150.465 (02)Topics in the Philosophy of PhysicsW 4:00PM - 6:30PMCarroll, Sean MichaelKrieger 304PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.475 (01)The Nature and Significance of Animal MindsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBrown, Simon Alexander BurnsGilman 288PHIL-MIND, PHIL-ETHICS, PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.482 (01)Food EthicsW 1:30PM - 4:00PMBarnhill, AnneSmokler Center 213PHIL-BIOETH
AS.211.265 (01)Panorama of German ThoughtTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMTobias, RochelleGilman 10
AS.213.374 (01)Existentialism in Literature and PhilosophyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMGosetti, Jennifer AnnaSmokler Center 213MLL-GERM, MLL-ENGL
AS.213.374 (02)Existentialism in Literature and PhilosophyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMGosetti, Jennifer AnnaSmokler Center 213MLL-GERM, MLL-ENGL
AS.214.479 (01)Dante Visits the AfterlifeMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSaiber, ArielleShriver Hall 104ENGL-PR1800
AS.300.351 (01)The Concept of TimeT 1:30PM - 4:00PMSouza Mendes, PaulaGilman 208
AS.300.399 (01)Cinema and PhilosophyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarrati, PaolaGilman 208
AS.310.335 (01)Theorizing Race and Mixed-Race in Asia and its DiasporasW 4:30PM - 7:00PMReizman, Laura Ha HaMergenthaler 252INST-CP
AS.363.302 (01)Feminist and Queer Theory: Women in Western Thought an IntroductionT 4:30PM - 7:00PMdeLire, Luce MarcellaMaryland 104INST-PT, MSCH-HUM