Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Freshman Seminar: The Greeks and Their Emotions
AS.040.109 (01)

This seminar is meant as an introduction to the study of ancient emotions, with a particular emphasis on how the ancient Greeks conceptualized, portrayed and lived their emotions through linguistic, literary and artistic expression. After an analysis of how the ancient Greek emotional experience differs from our own, we shall focus on the phenomenon of emotion as deeply rooted in the physical body, and in light of this we will contemplate (and question) its universality. You will also learn how to research and write a paper. Texts will be read in translation. No knowledge of ancient Greek required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Asuni, Michele
  • Room: Gilman 277  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (01)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. The course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 104
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (02)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. The course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 306
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (03)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. The course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 304
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (04)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. The course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Peter
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM

Introduction To Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (01)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 306
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Introduction To Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (02)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard
  • Room: Virtual Online Hodson 203
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Introduction To Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (03)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Introduction To Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (04)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard
  • Room: Virtual Online Wyman Park N105
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (01)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Virtual Online Bloomberg 172
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (02)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 313
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (03)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Virtual Online Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (04)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 304
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (05)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 277
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (06)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 75
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (07)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 308
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (08)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 202
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (09)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 277
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (10)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 217
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (11)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Virtual Online Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (12)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 300
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (13)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 381
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (14)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Virtual Online Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Formal Methods of Philosophy
AS.150.223 (01)

For better or for worse (and we think better), during the last century or so, philosophy has become infused with logic. Logic informs nearly every area of philosophy; it is part of our shared language and knowledge base. Vast segments of literature, especially in contemporary analytic philosophy, presuppose basic competence in logic and a familiarity with associated formal methods, particularly set theoretical. The standard philosophy curriculum should therefore guarantee a minimum level of logic literacy, thus enabling students to read the literature without it seeming like an impenetrable foreign tongue. This course is an introductory survey of the formal methods that a contemporary philosopher should be familiar with. It is not mathematically demanding in the way that more advanced courses in metalogic and specialized topics may be. The emphasis is on basic comprehension, not on mathematical virtuosity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Bledin, Justin
  • Room: Gilman 17  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/25
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND

Philosophy of Religion
AS.150.235 (01)

Can one prove or disprove the existence of God? What is the relation between reason and faith? Are science and religion at odds with one another? We will consider historically significant discussions of these questions as well as important contemporary writings.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 12:00PM - 12:50PM, MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Gross, Steven
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MIND

Philosophy of Religion
AS.150.235 (02)

Can one prove or disprove the existence of God? What is the relation between reason and faith? Are science and religion at odds with one another? We will consider historically significant discussions of these questions as well as important contemporary writings.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 12:00PM - 12:50PM, MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Gross, Steven
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 400
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MIND

Philosophy of Religion
AS.150.235 (03)

Can one prove or disprove the existence of God? What is the relation between reason and faith? Are science and religion at odds with one another? We will consider historically significant discussions of these questions as well as important contemporary writings.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 11:00AM - 11:50AM, MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Gross, Steven
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MIND

Philosophy of Religion
AS.150.235 (04)

Can one prove or disprove the existence of God? What is the relation between reason and faith? Are science and religion at odds with one another? We will consider historically significant discussions of these questions as well as important contemporary writings.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 11:00AM - 11:50AM, MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Gross, Steven
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 202
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MIND

Introduction to Metaphysics
AS.150.260 (01)

Metaphysics addresses fundamental questions about the nature and structure of reality. This course will offer an introduction to metaphysics, and a survey of metaphysical debates about topics including free will, possibility and necessity, and arguments for the existence of God.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 2:20PM, MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Taylor, Elanor J.
  • Room: Gilman 50 Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MIND

Introduction to Metaphysics
AS.150.260 (02)

Metaphysics addresses fundamental questions about the nature and structure of reality. This course will offer an introduction to metaphysics, and a survey of metaphysical debates about topics including free will, possibility and necessity, and arguments for the existence of God.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 3:00PM - 3:50PM, MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Taylor, Elanor J.
  • Room: Gilman 50 Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MIND

On Alien Thought and Alienated Life
AS.150.309 (01)

There are certain moral truths we hold to be self-evident: that all human beings are created equal, that honesty is a virtue and hypocrisy a vice, that wanton cruelty is heinous. Such things, we think, are not simply true, but necessarily true. Try as we might, we cannot seem to imagine them being otherwise than they actually are, say, that honesty were a vice, hypocrisy a virtue, and wanton cruelty praiseworthy, no more than we can imagine that 2+2 were to equal 5. What is the nature of this self-evidence? Does our inability to imagine things being otherwise simply reflects a psychological limitation of the human mind? Could there be alien life-forms who held such unimaginable things as necessary truths, with the same force of conviction with which we hold our own? If there were, could we trade our own worldview for theirs and live the lives of aliens? And what would become of our lives if we did?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Marom, Itai
  • Room: Smokler Center 301  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Digital Spinozism - Hypertextual Introduction To Spinoza’s Ethics
AS.150.321 (01)

Digital Spinozism will introduce you to Spinoza with the means of digital media. The global pandemic has accelerated the digitalization of teaching and the usage of digital media for research in the humanities more generally. This seminar uses digital tools to introduce Spinoza’s Ethics as a prime example of digital learning. Spinoza’s Ethics offers the whole spectrum of philosophical inquiry in just about 300 pages. Its content is as daring as it was in 1678 (when it was published): God and nature are the same thing (and that is all there is). Freedom does not exist – everything happens with necessity. The body and the soul are not distinct. We should guide our actions and our politics not according to abstract virtues or norms but according to a rational understanding of emotions. Thus, Spinoza’s philosophy helps us comprehend aspects of our contemporary life, such as emotions and their role in political processes in an interdisciplinary endeavour. Every week, we will read a package of topic based propositions, accompanied either by scaffolding secondary literature or else by class discussion aimed at framing the new material within preceding readings. We will also learn about various digital tools that are meant to make Spinoza’s writings more accessible to us and discuss our thoughts and questions on a messaging board beyond class time. Most of you are already familiar with some of the digital resources that we will be using (Zoom, pdfs etc.). For those seeking an academic career, familiarity with more advanced tools and the broadening of their capacity to think about approaching text in general will prove invaluable. However, the training offered in this class is highly applicable not only to other materials in the humanities, but also to concrete and daily digital interactions that we are already engaged in. As we learn about the structure and make up of digital communication, this knowledge becomes applicable not only to Spinoza, but beyond.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Gilman 134  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN

Mathematical Logic I
AS.150.420 (01)

Mathematical Logic I (H,Q) is the first semester of a year long course. It introduces the two notions of validity and provability for both sentential logic and first-order predicate logic, showing in each case that there is a system of derivation such that any argument is valid if and only if the conclusion is provable from the premises. The result is non-trivial since validity is a semantic notion involving the preservation of truth, while a proof is a finite syntactic object whose correctness can be effectively decided. The goal of the course, however, is to learn how to formulate mathematical theories in first-order logic and to explore various of their properties (or lack thereof) such as completeness, decidability, axiomatizability, finite axiomatizability, and consistency. The course concludes with a brief introduction to model theory and the interpretability of one theory in another, which is the basis for relative consistency proofs in mathematics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rynasiewicz, Robert
  • Room: Gilman 288  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI

Philosophy of Space & Time
AS.150.433 (01)

Is space an entity that exists independently of matter (substantivalism), or is it only an abstraction from spatial relations between bodies (relationism)? Is there a lapse of time even when nothing changes, or is time only a measure of motion? Are motion and rest contrary properties or states of a body, or are there only changes in the positions of bodies relative to one another? Philosophers and physicists have disputed these questions from antiquity to the present day. We survey the arguments and attempt to find a resolution. But there are further questions. What is the significance of incongruent counterparts (left hands vs. right hands)? Is there a fact of the matter as to the geometry of space (flat, hyperbolic or elliptical), or as to whether space-like separated events occur at the same time? What is the principle of relativity? Does Einstein’s theory have consequences for the substantivalist/relationist debate? What is the status of spacetime in current physics and cosmology? Why does time but not space have a “direction”? Are past, present and future objective features of reality, or are they merely “stubborn illusions”? Does time flow? If not, how do we account for our sense of the passage of time?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Rynasiewicz, Robert
  • Room: Shaffer 300  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM

Formal Methods of Philosophy
AS.150.434 (01)

For better or for worse (and we think better), during the last century or so, philosophy has become infused with logic. Logic informs nearly every area of philosophy; it is part of our shared language and knowledge base. Vast segments of literature, especially in contemporary analytic philosophy, presuppose basic competence in logic and a familiarity with associated formal methods, particularly set theoretical. The standard philosophy curriculum should therefore guarantee a minimum level of logic literacy, thus enabling students to read the literature without it seeming like an impenetrable foreign tongue. This course is an introductory survey of the formal methods that a contemporary philosopher should be familiar with. It is not mathematically demanding in the way that more advanced courses in metalogic and specialized topics may be. The emphasis is on basic comprehension, not on mathematical virtuosity. Co-taught with AS.150.223 Formal Methods of Philosophy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Bledin, Justin
  • Room: Gilman 17  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/9
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND

The Logic of Spinoza’s Ethics
AS.150.447 (01)

One of the unique aspects of Spinoza’s major work, the Ethics, is its formal or "geometric" structure. The book is written following the model of Euclid’s Elements, with Definitions, Axioms, Propositions, and Demonstrations. In this seminar, we scrutinize the deductive structure of the Ethics and some of its earlier drafts. We consider the role and epistemic status of the definitions and axioms, attempt to provide rigorous reconstructions of some of its key propositions, and also investigate the possibility of alternative routes between these propositions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 10:30AM - 1:00PM
  • Instructor: Bledin, Justin, Melamed, Yitzhak Yohanan
  • Room: Gilman 288  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN

Animal Points of View
AS.150.451 (01)

Are non-human animals conscious? Do they possess a stream of consciousness like our own? This course will explore these questions by asking what it is for an animal to possess a point of view and a temporal point of view in particular.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Simon Alexander Burns, Phillips, Ian B
  • Room: Bloomberg 172  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MIND, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Hegel’s Logic
AS.150.453 (01)

This seminar is a close study of Hegel’s major work, the Science of Logic. Among the issues to be discussed are the questions: How should philosophy begin and what - if anything - can it take for granted? We will also attempt to scrutinize Hegel’s attitude toward the law of non-contradiction.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Melamed, Yitzhak Yohanan
  • Room: Gilman 288  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN

Ethics And Animals
AS.150.455 (01)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Maryland 114  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS, PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-SEM, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Theory Of Value
AS.150.461 (01)

What is value? What is the difference between instrumental and final value? What is the relation of ethical and economic value? This course will explore a range of answers to these questions, with special focus on the role of desire and reason in determining value. Readings will include historical and contemporary authors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Moyar, Dean
  • Room: Gilman 288  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS

Trust: Literature and Philosophy
AS.213.271 (01)

Fake news, policing crises, political polarization, and the like challenge us to reevaluate the notion of trust. The course takes up this challenge with the help of both literary and philosophical texts that shall assist us in posing, and trying to answer, questions such as the following: What or whom should we trust (ourselves, others, neither)? Is it possible and sometimes even preferable not to trust? Or should we cultivate trust in society? If so, how? Authors may include ETA Hoffmann, Hegel, Nietzsche, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Yonover, Jason Maurice
  • Room: Ames 320  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Cinema and Philosophy
AS.300.399 (01)

What do films and philosophy have in common? Do films express, with their own means, philosophical problems that are relevant to our experience of ourselves and the world we live in? This term we will study such issues with a particular focus on questions of justice, truth, revenge, forgiveness, hope, hate, and fear.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marrati, Paola
  • Room: Gilman 75  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, Trees
AS.300.402 (01)

Knowing who or what counts as a person seems straightforward, until we consider the many kinds of creatures, objects, and artificial beings that have been granted—or demanded or denied—that status. This course explores recent debates on being a person in culture, law, and philosophy. Questions examined will include: Should trees have standing? Can corporations have religious beliefs? Could a robot sign a contract? Materials examined will be wide-ranging, including essays, philosophy, novels, science fiction, television, film. No special background is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Siraganian, Lisa Michele
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.040.109 (01)Freshman Seminar: The Greeks and Their EmotionsTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMAsuni, MicheleGilman 277
 
AS.150.136 (01)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMAchinstein, PeterVirtual Online
Maryland 104
COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.136 (02)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMAchinstein, PeterVirtual Online
Krieger 306
COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.136 (03)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMAchinstein, PeterVirtual Online
Krieger 304
COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.136 (04)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMAchinstein, PeterVirtual Online
Krieger 304
COGS-PHLMND, PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.201 (01)Introduction To Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBett, RichardVirtual Online
Krieger 306
PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.150.201 (02)Introduction To Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PMBett, RichardVirtual Online
Hodson 203
PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.150.201 (03)Introduction To Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBett, RichardVirtual Online
Maryland 104
PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.150.201 (04)Introduction To Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PMBett, RichardVirtual Online
Wyman Park N105
PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.150.219 (01)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, HilaryVirtual Online
Bloomberg 172
PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (02)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, HilaryVirtual Online
Gilman 313
PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (03)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMBok, HilaryVirtual Online
Bloomberg 178
PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (04)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMBok, HilaryVirtual Online
Krieger 304
PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (05)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMBok, HilaryVirtual Online
Gilman 277
PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (06)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMBok, HilaryVirtual Online
Gilman 75
PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (07)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMBok, HilaryVirtual Online
Krieger 308
PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (08)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMBok, HilaryVirtual Online
Maryland 202
PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (09)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 4:00PM - 4:50PMBok, HilaryVirtual Online
Gilman 277
PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (10)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 4:00PM - 4:50PMBok, HilaryVirtual Online
Gilman 217
PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (11)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMBok, HilaryVirtual Online
Bloomberg 178
PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (12)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMBok, HilaryVirtual Online
Krieger 300
PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (13)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMBok, HilaryVirtual Online
Gilman 381
PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (14)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMBok, HilaryVirtual Online
Bloomberg 178
PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.223 (01)Formal Methods of PhilosophyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBledin, JustinGilman 17
 
PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.235 (01)Philosophy of ReligionF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, MW 11:00AM - 11:50AMGross, StevenVirtual Online
Krieger 300
PHIL-MIND
AS.150.235 (02)Philosophy of ReligionF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, MW 11:00AM - 11:50AMGross, StevenVirtual Online
Gilman 400
PHIL-MIND
AS.150.235 (03)Philosophy of ReligionF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, MW 11:00AM - 11:50AMGross, StevenVirtual Online
Krieger 300
PHIL-MIND
AS.150.235 (04)Philosophy of ReligionF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, MW 11:00AM - 11:50AMGross, StevenVirtual Online
Maryland 202
PHIL-MIND
AS.150.260 (01)Introduction to MetaphysicsF 1:30PM - 2:20PM, MW 3:00PM - 3:50PMTaylor, Elanor J.Gilman 50
Gilman 186
PHIL-MIND
AS.150.260 (02)Introduction to MetaphysicsF 3:00PM - 3:50PM, MW 3:00PM - 3:50PMTaylor, Elanor J.Gilman 50
Gilman 55
PHIL-MIND
AS.150.309 (01)On Alien Thought and Alienated LifeTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMMarom, ItaiSmokler Center 301
 
PHIL-ETHICS
AS.150.321 (01)Digital Spinozism - Hypertextual Introduction To Spinoza’s EthicsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMStaffGilman 134
 
PHIL-MODERN
AS.150.420 (01)Mathematical Logic ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRynasiewicz, RobertGilman 288
 
PHIL-LOGSCI
AS.150.433 (01)Philosophy of Space & TimeTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMRynasiewicz, RobertShaffer 300
 
PHIL-LOGSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.434 (01)Formal Methods of PhilosophyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBledin, JustinGilman 17
 
PHIL-LOGSCI, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.447 (01)The Logic of Spinoza’s EthicsF 10:30AM - 1:00PMBledin, Justin, Melamed, Yitzhak YohananGilman 288
 
PHIL-MODERN
AS.150.451 (01)Animal Points of ViewM 4:00PM - 6:30PMBrown, Simon Alexander Burns, Phillips, Ian BBloomberg 172
 
PHIL-MIND, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.453 (01)Hegel’s LogicW 4:00PM - 6:30PMMelamed, Yitzhak YohananGilman 288
 
PHIL-MODERN
AS.150.455 (01)Ethics And AnimalsF 1:30PM - 4:00PMBok, HilaryMaryland 114
 
PHIL-ETHICS, PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-SEM, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.461 (01)Theory Of ValueM 1:30PM - 4:00PMMoyar, DeanGilman 288
 
PHIL-ETHICS
AS.213.271 (01)Trust: Literature and PhilosophyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMYonover, Jason MauriceAmes 320
 
AS.300.399 (01)Cinema and PhilosophyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarrati, PaolaGilman 75
 
AS.300.402 (01)What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, TreesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSiraganian, Lisa MicheleGilman 208